Skip to content

Bookshelf

There’s a lot to read out there. Here is a snapshot of what we’ve been reading. Don’t take this as an endorsement of the books or the authors (unless we actually say it). If you have questions or comments about the books, feel free to contact us by email.

Tim Nelson’s Bookshelf

The Books of the BibleThis is an excellent resource to help people read through the New Testament quickly. It is simply the biblical text with no commentators notes and no other chapters and verses that have the tendency to impede our reading. Consequently, it reads more like a novel or collection of stories and brings us back to the original manuscript of Scripture. Highly recommend it.

 

The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business, by Patrick Lencioni (Jossey Bass, 2012). Very insightful and practical book about the importance of organizational health for any business, church or group. Lencioni makes the case that organizational health trumps any other factor in determining the overall growth of an organization. While this may be overstated, his insights are worth considering. Great for leaders.

 

Darrell Yoder’s Bookshelf

Radical: Taking Back Your Faith From the American Dream, by David Platt (Multnomah Books, 2010). I am only into chapter 3, but so far this is a fantastic book. Platt is a megachurch pastor deeply concerned about the way we (in the US) have hijacked the Gospel in exchange for the American Dream. We have reduced Jesus to something merely added to our lives and elevated ourselves to the center. Even genuine Jesus followers have done this. I have done this. We need books like this to call us out. A friend of mine recently said this book was the “most life-changing book we ever read.” We’ll see what the rest of the book is like.

Irresistible Revolution: Living As An Ordinary Radical by Shane Claiborne (Zondervan, 2006). In this book, Claiborne describes his (and others’) experiences of pursuing a life radically abandoned to the way of Jesus. He tells stories of advocating for the homeless, serving with Mother Teresa in Calcutta, working at the monstrous ministry of Willow Creek Community Church, traveling to Iraq during the Iraq War, and more. These days, I am very interested in stories like this that challenge me to think new thoughts about what following Christ really demands today. I continue to wrestle with this question for my own life and for my faith community.